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Closing "Reads" and Starting a New Project

As of today, I've closed Reads and removed all of the content:  what was formerly at http://reads.kyle-brady.com and on Twitter @KRBreads no longer exists.

However, this is because I'm converting what began as a personal project into a more universally accessible open source academic research transparency project.  This is known as Project Reads:  it currently has a placeholder page on this site and will eventually have its own domain.  For now, however, there isn't much to share.  This conversion/creation process may take a few months.

Stay tuned!

Kyle R. Brady

Publishing Note: "The Role of Allies in the Modern Era: Four Choices for Western Governments"

I have a piece now out at Small Wars Journal:  "The Role of Allies in the Modern Era: Four Choices for Western Governments."

This article discusses the four choices for western governments when considering how to approach both allies and alliances, particularly with respect to costs/benefits and preferred outcomes.  The analysis is also grounded in a very timely and modern context.

Go take a look!

Quick Note: "The View from Washington" v. "The View from Moscow"

As the United States and Russia continue down a path that towards The New Cold War aka Cold War II, I came across two maps worth considering, since they illuminate a rather stark point of forgotten clarity.

Courtesy of Dr. Marcus Faulkner from the Department of War Studies at King's College London, the following two maps of perspective and reach come from a book on the Cold War from Sir Lawrence Freedman:

"The View from Washington"

"The View from Moscow"

Publishing Note: "Beyond Personalities: The Inevitability, Polarization, and Institutionalization of the Cold War"


My latest paper as a postgraduate student at King's College London is now out:  "Beyond Personalities: The Inevitability, Polarization, and Institutionalization of the Cold War."
As World War II ended in 1945 and the Cold War rose from its ashes, the United States and the Soviet Union stood opposed each other in nearly every way possible. Despite the prior cooperation of these two states during the largest war known to humanity -- under the guidance of American President Franklin Delano Roosevelt and Soviet General Secretary Josef Stalin -- the inevitability of the Cold War was set long before the end of World War II and it outlived both legendary leaders. Given the immense personification of the Cold War, particularly during its early years, the question remains why the conflict lasted decades beyond the death of the two leaders who guided their countries to superpower status, foresaw the arrival of the Cold War, and undertook preparations. The answer to such a question is threefold and can be found in the inevitability, polarization, and institutionalization of the Cold War.
You can find it through Academia.edu or as an open access PDF.

Go take a look!

Publishing Note: "Reforming the Republic of Turkey: Erdoğan’s Power Project"


My latest peer reviewed, academic piece at Strife Blog is now out:  "Reforming the Republic of Turkey: Erdoğan’s Power Project."
After the military-led July 2016 coup attempt failed to overthrow Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdoğan in July 2016, a counter-coup effort was initiated by Erdogan to remove any alleged co-conspirators from power. At the time, Erdoğan’s retaliation was expected but the initial response was still overblown, with structurally damaging and problematic consequences to both civil society and the international theatre. In the months following, Erdoğan has undertaken a massive effort that appears to target any enemies – real, perceived, or invented – who stand in opposition to his goals to reform the country. In a continued state of emergency, with expanded national security powers, and with more than 125,000 Turks already removed or suspended from their positions within the military or government, the counter-coup cleanup has clearly exceeded external expectations as the country moves toward autocracy.
Go take a look!

Publishing Note: "Safety, Security, and Society in the New Space Age: Exploring the Enforcement Structures and Concerns of Postplanetary Humanity"


My latest peer reviewed article is now out in ahead-of-print at New Space:  "Safety, Security, and Society in the New Space Age: Exploring the Enforcement Structures and Concerns of Postplanetary Humanity."  A print edition should be coming in early 2017.

The article, available with free/open online access through the end of 2016, reviews the issues of an increasingly complicated space environment involving both military and civilian interests, and concludes with the introduction of a framework to address security, law enforcement, and military concerns:
With a seemingly resurgent public interest in the exploration and utilization of space (and its many recent successes), the increasing likelihood of regular manned spaceflight, the general commercialization of space, the privatization of spaceflight, a reformed curiosity in planetary defense, and the nascent militarization of space, the issues of operations, exploration, and safety in space—particularly in the various Earth orbits—are now more pressing than ever before. How space is used, by whom, and in accordance with what conventions, treaties, or pragmatic considerations are now very important topics for consideration, particularly as orbital debris now poses a very serious threat to satellites and space-faring humans alike. Although often considered a fanciful notion without merit and well within the realm of science fiction, the time has come to seriously consider addressing a growing need of modernity: safety, security, and society in the new space age.
Take a look!

Publishing Note: "Assessing the Role of Nuclear Weapons in the 1950s and 1960s as Escalatory Peacemaking Devices"


My first paper as a postgraduate student in the Department of War Studies at King's College London ("Assessing the Role of Nuclear Weapons in the 1950s and 1960s as Escalatory Peacemaking Devices") is now out and available on Academia.edu or as a regular PDF file:
As World War II came to a close in 1945, a successor conflict between the United States and the Soviet Union appeared increasingly inevitable. Over the course of the mid- and late-twentieth century, the world’s only two superpowers engaged with each other through a number of proxy conflicts -- never in actual open conflict -- until the Soviet Union collapsed in 1991. This Cold War became infamous, both contemporaneously and historically, for the development, testing, brief usage, strategizing, and politicization of nuclear weapons; however, the principles of a peculiar nuclear-based peace are often unexplored. It is important, therefore, to understand and acknowledge that nuclear weapons did more than push the world to the very edge of global human catastrophe: they also ensured that the world’s strongest states avoided open conflict. This avoidance of open conflict produced a particularly agitated and escalatory, but permanent, form of peace between the United States and the Soviet Union.
Go check it out, on Academia.edu or as a PDF!

Publishing Note: "The New Cold War: The Birth of a Resurgent Conflict"

My latest piece is now up at Strife: "The New Cold War: The Birth of a Resurgent Conflict."


This piece addresses what appears to be the rebirth of the Cold War between the United States and Russia, as evidenced by a number of escalatory/provocative acts and the various Cold War-era behaviors of both states.

Go check it out!

In Brief: Comparing the Number of Terror Attacks per Year per Region

I was writing an academic piece on how the apparent modern prevalence of terrorism in Western societies is actually not what it seems -- neither in terms of the strict number of attacks nor the pervasive feeling of imminent/constant terrorism -- but I couldn't get it to work.  After three substantial rewrites, I've given up on the piece itself.

However, I think the data is worth considering on its own merits, so I'm presenting it here in chart form.  All data is accurate through CY2015 and courtesy of the Global Terrorism Database from START and UMD.

Number of Terror Attacks per Year per Region
click for larger view