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Publishing Note: "Assessing the Relevant Failures of the U.S. Intelligence Community Regarding the Attacks of September 11, 2001"

My latest paper for King's College London ("Assessing the Relevant Failures of the U.S. Intelligence Community Regarding the Attacks of September 11, 2001") is complete:

"According to George Tenet, former Director of Central Intelligence, “‘the system was blinking red’ during the summer of 2001,” just prior to the terror attacks of September 11 conducted by al Qaeda on the World Trade Center complex in New York City and on the Pentagon outside of Washington, D.C.  

All of the necessary intelligence to understand, respond to, and mitigate the attacks -- perhaps even prevent them -- seems to have been either fully encapsulated by the U.S. intelligence community (USIC) or easily within its reach.  Various failures, however, of the USIC permitted the success of these world-changing attacks and the violent deaths of 2,973 people.  These attacks were, and remain, America’s “largest loss of life … on its soil as a result of hostile attack.”

Among the Final Report of the National Commission on Terrorist Attacks upon the United States; countless academic books and journal articles; endless works of investigative journalism found in newspapers, magazines, and books; and a variety of U.S. government (USG) assessments, the unfortunate conclusion seems clear:  the USIC failed to prevent the attacks not for lack of effort or information, but, largely, for lack of coordination.  It is, therefore, worth reviewing the reasons for which the events of September 11 occurred and the systemic reasons these events were not thwarted.  Such a review is particularly worthwhile, given that this damaging, scarring, and embarrassing event has so profoundly shaped a wide array of actions and activity in the intervening sixteen years."

It's available via PDF or on Academia.edu.

Kyle R. Brady