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Publishing Note: "On Whether Democracy in the Middle East Will Bring Peace and Stability to the Region"

My latest (and last!) paper for King's College London ("On Whether Democracy in the Middle East Will Bring Peace and Stability to the Region") is complete:

"A recurring intellectual and political theme regarding the Middle East and North Africa (MENA), which appears frequently and always has great popular appeal, is disarmingly simple:  bring democracy to the region, and both peace and stability will follow.  As the theory goes, peace and stability are a byproduct of democratic governments, democratic governments do not go to war against each other, and democratic governments create economic prosperity more evenly distributed than in autocratic systems.  With thousands of years of conflict in the region and, until relatively recently, a distinct lack of democratic governance, the intent and appeal of such a theory is clearly visible.  However, prior to assessing whether democracy would be beneficial to specific states or people in MENA, it is first important to assess democracy itself and how it would come to be."

It's available via PDF or Academia.edu.

Kyle R. Brady

Publishing Note: "Assessing the Start of the Arab Spring and Relevant Factors"

My latest paper for King's College London ("Assessing the Start of the Arab Spring and Relevant Factors") is complete:

"In December 2010, what would soon be known as the Arab Spring began with protests and political unrest in Tunisia.  Subsequently, political action of various types and strengths began to appear across the Middle East and North Africa and concluded some time between the end of 2011 and mid-2012.  Years later, however, assessing the ultimate successes and failures of the Arab Spring remains a complex, politically-fraught endeavor.

An important question -- as academic as it is practical -- remains:  why did the Arab Spring ignite in the final days of 2010? Why was this sweeping sense of change, however fraught and fractured, not felt and expressed earlier?  Why did it not come later?"

It's available via PDF or Academia.edu.

Kyle R. Brady

Quarterly Review: June 30, 2018

This post is part of a series I'm calling Quarterly Review:  every three months, I post a review of all that I've published over that period.  This collection of publications will ensure nothing gets lost and provides an opportunity for some reflection-at-a-distance.

This Quarterly Review covers April 1, 2018 through June 30, 2018.

(It was another light quarter, because I was very busy elsewhere. This will soon change.)

Postgraduate Papers

Kyle R. Brady

Publishing Note: "On the Viability of Limited Nuclear Weapons as Strategy"

My latest paper for King's College London ("On the Viability of Limited Nuclear Weapons as Strategy") is complete:

"Limited nuclear warfare -- small-scale nuclear attacks that do not develop into a larger nuclear conflict -- has been a strategic concept with varying levels of military and political support for many decades.  The underlying principle of limited nuclear warfare has always been in a pre-emptive or preclusive strike capacity, with the intention of either preventing or avoiding a larger nuclear conflict. In another interpretation of the concept, however, a strategy of limited nuclear warfare could be employed against non-nuclear powers as a method of definitively striking an enemy, without causing large-scale nuclear damage, to prevent a larger traditional conflict.

There remains some debate -- academically, socially, and within governments -- about whether limited nuclear strikes can and should be used.  More specifically, there seems to be something of an open question as to whether a limited nuclear strike would be tolerated.  Would a nuclear state elect to not respond, in-kind, with a nuclear attack?  Would a non-nuclear state look to its nuclear allies for a response-in-kind? The long-dominant strategic theory of Mutually Assured Destruction and the underlying principles of human psychology have, thus far, precluded the combat use of nuclear weapons in any context other than their original debut at the end of World War II.   However, given the rise of increasing technological and sociopolitical complexities in a worldwide environment that continues to see the development and limited success of non-state actors, the question of limited nuclear strikes as a viable strategic option has newfound relevancy and depth."

It's available via PDF or Academia.edu.

Kyle R. Brady

Quarterly Review: March 31, 2018

This post is part of a series I'm calling Quarterly Review:  every three months, I post a review of all that I've published over that period.  This collection of publications will ensure nothing gets lost and provides an opportunity for some reflection-at-a-distance.

This Quarterly Review covers January 1, 2018 through March 31, 2018.

(It was a light quarter, since I was very busy elsewhere.)

Postgraduate Papers

Kyle R. Brady

Publishing Note: "Assessing the Relevant Failures of the U.S. Intelligence Community Regarding the Attacks of September 11, 2001"

My latest paper for King's College London ("Assessing the Relevant Failures of the U.S. Intelligence Community Regarding the Attacks of September 11, 2001") is complete:

"According to George Tenet, former Director of Central Intelligence, “‘the system was blinking red’ during the summer of 2001,” just prior to the terror attacks of September 11 conducted by al Qaeda on the World Trade Center complex in New York City and on the Pentagon outside of Washington, D.C.  

All of the necessary intelligence to understand, respond to, and mitigate the attacks -- perhaps even prevent them -- seems to have been either fully encapsulated by the U.S. intelligence community (USIC) or easily within its reach.  Various failures, however, of the USIC permitted the success of these world-changing attacks and the violent deaths of 2,973 people.  These attacks were, and remain, America’s “largest loss of life … on its soil as a result of hostile attack.”

Among the Final Report of the National Commission on Terrorist Attacks upon the United States; countless academic books and journal articles; endless works of investigative journalism found in newspapers, magazines, and books; and a variety of U.S. government (USG) assessments, the unfortunate conclusion seems clear:  the USIC failed to prevent the attacks not for lack of effort or information, but, largely, for lack of coordination.  It is, therefore, worth reviewing the reasons for which the events of September 11 occurred and the systemic reasons these events were not thwarted.  Such a review is particularly worthwhile, given that this damaging, scarring, and embarrassing event has so profoundly shaped a wide array of actions and activity in the intervening sixteen years."

It's available via PDF or on Academia.edu.

Kyle R. Brady

Quarterly Review: December 31, 2017

This post is part of a series I'm calling Quarterly Review:  every three months, I post a review of all that I've published over that period.  This collection of publications will ensure nothing gets lost and provides an opportunity for some reflection-at-a-distance.

This Quarterly Review covers October 1, 2017 through December 31, 2017.

OPINION ARTICLES

POSTGRADUATE PAPERS

Kyle R. Brady

Publishing Note: "Considering the History, Structure, and Function of the U.S. Intelligence Community During the Cold War"

My latest paper for King's College London ("Considering the History, Structure, and Function of the U.S. Intelligence Community During the Cold War") is complete:

"The Cold War had an immense impact on the United States intelligence community (USIC), both in terms of its organization and its activities.  The American system of intelligence collection and analysis -- previously all but nonexistent -- was created, developed, and matured during the Cold War into a form that, by the end of the period, closely resembled its modern form.  Due to the nature of the Cold War and its singular enemy of focus -- the Soviet Union -- the USIC was forced to emerge and evolve within a country and context previously uninterested in a permanent intelligence service, much less an entire community."

It's available via PDF or on Academia.edu.

Kyle R. Brady

Quarterly Review: September 30, 2017

This post is part of a series I'm calling Quarterly Review:  every three months, I post a review of all that I've published over that period.  This collection of publications will ensure nothing gets lost and provides an opportunity for some reflection-at-a-distance.

This Quarterly Review covers June 5, 2017 through September 30, 2017.

Opinion Articles

Postgraduate Papers

Kyle R. Brady

Publishing Note: "Technology and Insurgency: Advancing Propaganda, Mission, and Combat"

The latest paper for my postgraduate studies at King's College London ("Technology and Insurgency: Advancing Propaganda, Mission, and Combat") is now out:

"In 2017, the fundamentals of communications have changed, worldwide.  This simple truth -- born out of the rise of the Internet, cellphones, digital communications tools, social media, and much more -- have forever augmented the daily lives of humanity.  Although these tools have been used to substantially improve lives in countless ways, they have also affected various aspects of conflict.  It seems self-evident, then -- with even only a cursory awareness of the subject -- that those involved in a networked insurgency undoubtedly view such tools of technology and media as beneficial.  As such, it is a topic worth assessing in greater detail."

It's available publicly via PDF or via Academia.edu.

Go take a look!

Kyle R. Brady